Thursday, October 1, 2020

Safari suit

 Safari suit




A safari jacket or bush jacket is a garment originally designed for the purpose of going on safari in the African bush. When paired with trousers or shorts, it becomes a safari suit.A safari jacket is commonly a lightweight cotton drill or lighter poplin jacket, traditionally khaki in color, with a self-belt, epaulets, four or more expandable bellows pockets and often with cartridge loops.

History

Lightweight, light-coloured uniforms were worn by European soldiers serving in warm climates from the 19th century and, little altered, throughout World War II. They typically featured epaulettes, pleated pockets, belts and other features later found on safari jackets.The earliest reference to a 'safari suit' listed in The Oxford English Dictionary is from an American newspaper in 1935. In 1936, author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway designed a 'bush jacket' which was made by Willis & Geiger Outfitters. In 1939, Abercrombie & Fitch advertised safari jackets, shorts and trousers, of 'coat shirt style' for sports and leisure wear.

Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche "Safari" jacket (1968)

In the 1960s and 1970s safari suits became fashionable thanks to designer versions for men and women by, for example, French designers Ted Lapidus and Yves Saint Laurent, both of whom are among those credited with inventing and popularising the look.

In India, the safari suit gained popularity through the 1970s influenced to a large degree by films (James Bond/Roger Moore) and some fashions trends from the west for warmer climates. The safari suit in India gained prominence when local synthetic fibre manufacture and supply was significantly increased in the later half of the 1970s.

Reliance Industries and other textile manufactures set up synthetic fibre plants in India significantly reducing the price of synthetic fibre and the Indian middle class jumped at the opportunity to be well dressed in a fabric which, though unsuited to India's climate was fairly cheap, easy to maintain and long-lasting.The safari suit continued to be the de facto business attire, particularly in government/public sectors and the SMB arena in India, through the late-1990s. With India's growth over the 1990s, liberalization and with the middle class suddenly having more disposable income, the younger generations began to gravitate towards more modern western fashions such as suits and other business attire. 

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