Monday, April 12, 2021

Oxford Shoes

Oxford Shoes 

An Oxford shoe is characterized by shoelace eyelets tabs that are attached under the vamp,a feature termed "closed lacing". This contrasts with Derbys, or bluchers, which have shoelace eyelets attached to the top of the vamp. Originally, Oxfords were plain, formal shoes, made of leather, but they evolved into a range of styles suitable for formal, uniform, or casual wear. On the basis of function and the dictates of fashion, Oxfords are now made from a variety of materials, including calf leather, faux and genuine patent leather, suede, and canvas. They are normally black or brown, and may be plain or patterned (brogue).

The meaning of "Oxford" and "Balmoral" may vary geographically. In the United States, "Balmoral" is often synonymous with "Oxford".In the United Kingdom, "Oxford" is sometimes used for any more formal lace-up shoe, including the Blucher and Derby. In Britain and other countries, the Balmoral is an Oxford with no seams, apart from the toe cap seam, descending to the welt, a style common on boots. Oxford shoes are also known by their variation, or style. The Cap-Toe Oxford is the most well-known, although 'Whole Cut', 'Plain Toe', and a variation of 'Brogue' Oxfords are commonly referred to styles.Shoes with closed lacing (Oxfords/Balmorals) are considered more formal than those with open lacing (Bluchers/Derbys). A particular type of oxford shoe is the wholecut oxford, its upper made from a single piece of leather with only a single seam at the back.





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